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Minnesota Supreme Court denies Dede Evavold and Sandra Grazzini-Rucki petitions

The Minnesota Supreme Court has denied the petitions filed by Deirdre “Dede” Evavold and Sandra Grazzini-Rucki to review their criminal convictions for their role in the disappearance of two of Grazzini-Rucki’s children.

On April 19, 2013, Samantha and Gianna Rucki disappeared during a custody and divorce dispute involving their parents – Sandra Grazzini-Rucki and David Rucki.

Grazzini-Rucki’s petition was denied last week by the Minnesota Supreme Court, and Evavold’s petition was denied in an order released this morning.

Evavold’s legal troubles are not over, as her criminal trial for her continued violations of an Harassment Restraining Order granted by a court in Dakota County to protect David Rucki and his family from her harassment is scheduled for April 23, 2018. Continue reading

MacDonald isn’t ruling out run for Minnesota Supreme Court in 2020

Michelle MacDonald, who was labeled a “person of interest” in the disappearance of missing children and is currently under investigation by the Office of Lawyers Professional Responsibility, is not ruling out a fourth run for the Minnesota Supreme Court in 2020. Last week, MacDonald was defeated by Associate Justice Margaret Chutich in her third failed campaign for the Minnesota Supreme Court.

News that MacDonald had not ruled out another run for the Minnesota Supreme Court in 2020 was first reported by Steve Timmer, who contacted MacDonald to inquire about her running again.

After losing her third statewide election, the news that MacDonald has not ruled out another run for the Minnesota Supreme Court is shocking.

While MacDonald did receive 825,779 votes last week, she is currently being investigated by the Office of Lawyers Professional Responsibility for alleged violations of the Minnesota Rules of Professional Conduct governing licensed attorneys. The investigation into the alleged violations by MacDonald was opened after Missing in Minnesota filed a formal complaint with the Office of Lawyers Professional Responsibility in June after MacDonald filed a “frivolous and vexatious” lawsuit against Missing in Minnesota, which appears to be in violation of an Order of the Minnesota Supreme Court which details the conditions by which MacDonald is allowed to practice law.

The Office of Lawyers Professional Responsibility was notified last month about MacDonald repeating the same allegations against Judge David Knutson that were described as “recklessly false” by the Minnesota Supreme Court.

The Minnesota Supreme Court suspended MacDonald’s law license for 60 days earlier this year and she remains on probation for two years in response to an attorney complaint filed against MacDonald in August 2016.  The complaint filed against MacDonald focused on her behavior during family court proceedings involving Sandra Grazzini-Rucki and her legal representation of Joseph Francis D’Costa.

It was during the custody hearing involving Grazzini-Rucki and her ex-husband, David Rucki, on September 12, 2013, that MacDonald took pictures in the courtroom which led to her being arrested.

Booking photo from MacDonald’s arrest on September 12, 2013.

MacDonald spent a portion of the trial representing Grazzini-Rucki while confined to a wheelchair after her refusal to walk back into the courtroom. MacDonald also refused to put on her shoes and glasses, or provide her legal name and address to law enforcement.

MacDonald’s direct responsibility for her conduct which led to her arrest was repeatedly mentioned in the order from the Minnesota Supreme Court.

If the outcome of the current investigation into MacDonald were to cause her to lose her law license again, MacDonald could be precluded from running for the Minnesota Supreme Court in 2020. Under state law, only licensed attorneys meet the legal qualification to run for judge in Minnesota.

MacDonald’s legal work examined in a new book

MacDonald was labeled in April 2015 as a “person of interest” by the Lakeville Police Department in the disappearance of Samantha and Gianna Rucki. MacDonald refused to cooperate with the Lakeville Police Department’s investigation into her possible involvement in the disappearance of the sisters  – even after public statements from her that she would cooperate in the investigation. Her criminal defense attorney, Stephen Grigsby, said in 2015 that he would advise MacDonald to not speak with the Lakeville Police Department.

An examination of MacDonald’s legal work is included in the new book, The Girls Are Gone. The book also includes new information about the disappearance of Samantha and Gianna Rucki and the adults who conspired to keep the missing sisters and the truth hidden.

The Girls Are Gone also explores the connection between MacDonald and two people convicted for their roles in the disappearance of the Rucki sisters: Sandra Grazzini-Rucki and Dede Evavold. MacDonald was labeled a “person of interest” by the Lakeville Police Department in the disappearance of Samantha and Gianna Rucki but did not cooperate in the investigation.

The Girls Are Gone is published by Wise Ink Creative Publishing and was released last month.

Please follow Missing in Minnesota on Twitter and Facebook for updates on the investigation into Michelle MacDonald.

Allison Mann contributed to this story.

Evavold working for new trials to ‘adversely affect sales’ of upcoming book

Dede Evavold, convicted of six felonies for her role in the disappearance of two sisters, is working to get new criminal trials for herself and her co-defendants – not because she claims innocence – but to “adversely affect sales” of an upcoming book which provides new details on the crimes she and others committed. 

Last week, Michael Brodkorb and Allison Mann announced the upcoming release of their book, The Girls Are Gone which provides new details about the disappearance of Samantha and Gianna Rucki and the adults who conspired to keep the missing sisters and the truth hidden.

The book examines the events which led to Sandra Grazzini-Rucki abducting her daughters on April 19, 2013, during a custody dispute with her ex-husband, David Rucki. On November 18, 2015 –944 days after they disappeared – the girls were found living on a ranch in northern Minnesota by law enforcement, headed by the Lakeville Police Department.

In September 2016, Evavold was convicted of six felonies for her involvement in the disappearance of Samantha and Gianna Rucki. Continue reading

Video shows MacDonald and Evavold partying at GOP State Convention

A recently uncovered video shows Michelle MacDonald partying with her then campaign chair and manager Dede Evavold at the 2014 Republican Party of Minnesota State Convention, during the time Evavold was actively concealing the whereabouts of two missing sisters.

At the time of this video, Evavold was working on MacDonald’s 2014 campaign for the Minnesota Supreme Court.

Last week, MacDonald filed again to run for the Minnesota Supreme Court.

Evavold was convicted in September 2016 on six counts of felony deprivation of parental rights involving the disappearance of Samantha and Gianna Rucki.

The girls’ mother, Sandra Grazzini-Rucki, abducted her daughters during a divorce and custody dispute with her ex-husband, David Rucki.

Grazzini-Rucki was also convicted of six felonies for her role in the disappearance of her daughters.

MacDonald served as Grazzini-Rucki’s family court attorney and briefly represented her during her criminal trial.

In the video, Evavold is holding a half-empty glass of beer, and she tells MacDonald that they are campaigning on “truth.”

Evavold worked with MacDonald’s campaign for 540 of the 944 days the Rucki children were missing. Continue reading

Deja vu: Michelle MacDonald running again for Minnesota Supreme Court

Michelle MacDonald, who was labeled a “person of interest” in the disappearance of missing children, filed to run again for the Minnesota Supreme Court, despite being on supervised probation as an attorney.

MacDonald filed to run against Justice Margaret Chutich, who was appointed by Governor Mark Dayton to the Minnesota Supreme Court in March 2016.

She first attempted to file to run for the Minnesota Supreme Court under a new political party but was denied because judicial elections are nonpartisan.

Justice Margaret Chutich

MacDonald previously ran twice unsuccessfully for the Minnesota Supreme Court in 2014 and 2016.

MacDonald’s law license was just “conditionally reinstated” by the Minnesota Supreme Court in March, subject to her completion of the written portion of the Bar exam “on the subject of professional responsibility…”

She remains on supervised probation for two years with numerous conditions limiting her practice of law which could limit her ability to serve on the Minnesota Supreme Court if elected.

The Associated Press reported that House Speaker Kurt Daudt, R-Crown, said “ugh” after MacDonald confirmed she was running for office again.

According to the most recent campaign finance reports, MacDonald had $31.70 in her campaign bank account and debts of $8,825.12.

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Dede Evavold may have violated her probation again

Dede Evavold, who may have her probation revoked next month, may have violated her probation again by having contact with co-defendant Sandra Grazzini-Rucki.

Evavold was convicted in September 2016 of six felonies for her role in the disappearance of Samantha Rucki and her sister Gianna, who were abducted near their home on Lakeville by their mother Grazzini-Rucki, during a custody and divorce proceeding.

Evavold’s probation conditions specifically restrict contact with “Co-Defendant(s), Sandra Grazzini-Rucki, Gina Dahlen and Douglas Dahlen.”

On May 10, 2018, the United States Supreme Court docketed a Petition for Writ of Certiorari filed on behalf of Sandra Grazzini-Rucki regarding the contested child support matter stemming from her divorce from David Rucki.

On the Supreme Court docket, Grazzini-Rucki appears as a pro se party. However, her address is listed as Evavold’s home in St. Cloud, Minnesota.

Missing in Minnesota has redacted Evavold’s address from a screen capture of the public filing available on the website of the United State Supreme Court.

According to Stearns County Community Corrections, Grazzini-Rucki will be living at an address in Stearns County while she is on supervised probation.

An exact address for Grazzini-Rucki is not publicly available.

Grazzini-Rucki has no known relatives that live in Stearns County, but a small number of her remaining supporters live in the area, including Evavold.

By filing a Petition for Writ of Certiorari, Grazzini-Rucki is requesting that the US Supreme Court review the decision of the lower court regarding her child support obligations.

Filed with the Petition for Writ is a Motion for Leave to Proceed In Forma Pauperis in which Grazzini-Rucki claims again to be homeless, penniless and destitute – a claim which has since been refuted. Continue reading

Dede Evavold creates confusion over jail sentence

Dede Evavold was not required to report to jail today, despite Evavold herself publishing documents which claimed she was scheduled to serve 15 days in jail starting on April 19, 2018, and continuing each April 19 until 2023.

Evavold created the confusion last year when she published documents which detailed her scheduled for reporting to jail for the next six years related to her felony convictions for her role in the disappearance of Samantha Rucki and her sister Gianna, who were abducted near their home on Lakeville by their mother Sandra Grazzini-Rucki, during a custody and divorce proceeding.

After reviewing court documents which conflicted with Evavold’s claims, court staff at the Dakota County Judicial Center was able to verify that the information posted by Evavold was incorrect and she was not required to report to jail today.

Dede Evavold (in white) sits in the front row of the Minnesota Senate Judiciary Committee next to Michelle MacDonald (in red) on April 17, 2018.
Dede Evavold (in white) sits in the front row of the Minnesota Senate Judiciary Committee next to Michelle MacDonald (in red) on April 17, 2018.

In a bizarre unrelated development, Evavold attended a public committee hearing of the Minnesota Senate Judiciary Committee earlier this week. Evavold was seen on public television sitting and chatting with Michelle MacDonald, who is Grazzini-Rucki’s family court attorney.

Evavold served as MacDonald’s campaign chair and manager during MacDonald’s unsuccessful bid for the Minnesota Supreme Court in 2014.

MacDonald’s law license was “conditionally reinstated” in the last few weeks by the Minnesota Supreme Court after her license was suspended related to her conduct while serving as Grazzini-Rucki’s family court attorney and her legal representation of Joseph Francis D’Costa. Continue reading

Michelle MacDonald’s law license suspended by Minnesota Supreme Court

The Minnesota Supreme Court has suspended Michelle MacDonald’s law license for a minimum of 60 days, and she will be on supervised probation in response to an attorney complaint filed against MacDonald in August 2016.

A judicial referee appointed by the Minnesota Supreme Court recommended last year that MacDonald’s law license be suspended for a minimum of 60 days, followed by two years of probation, which would include a mental health evaluation.

But the final order from the Minnesota Supreme Court did not include a mental health evaluation which triggered Associate Justice Anne McKeig to dissent in part from the court’s decision.

The conditions of MacDonald’s two-year probation include that her probation will be supervised by an attorney appointed by the Director of the Office of Lawyers Professional Responsibility.

MacDonald is prohibited from engaging in “the solo practice of law” and she must “work in a setting where she is in daily contact with, and under the direct supervision of another Minnesota licensed attorney.”

The order from the Minnesota Supreme court states that the “attorney who directly supervises [MacDonald’s] work must co-sign all pleadings, briefs, and other court documents that respondent files. This attorney may not be an associate who works for respondent’s law firm. Any attorney or law firm with whom she practices shall be informed of the terms of this probation.”

MacDonald did not respond to a request for comment on the order from the Minnesota Supreme Court.

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Michelle MacDonald helped Dede Evavold in masking the extent of her role in the disappearance of Rucki sisters

Michelle MacDonald, who serves as Sandra Grazzini-Rucki’s family court attorney, helped Dede Evavold during a media interview in masking the extent of her full role in the disappearance of Samantha and Gianna Rucki based on a video published by Evavold.

In the video published by Evavold last week, MacDonald instructs Evavold on how to correctly answer a question from the producer with ABC’s “20/20” after Evavold mistakenly admitted a key element of her criminal involvement in the disappearance of the Rucki sisters in an interview.

This video was recorded before Evavold was charged with four additional felonies, and before she was convicted of a total of six felonies for her involvement in the disappearance of Samantha and Gianna Rucki.

Evavold served as MacDonald’s campaign chair and manager during MacDonald’s unsuccessful bid for the Minnesota Supreme Court in 2014.

MacDonald’s client, Sandra Grazzini-Rucki, was also convicted of six felonies for her role in the disappearance of her daughters.

The video provides further evidence of MacDonald’s direct involvement in the propaganda machinery of Grazzini-Rucki and Evavold. Continue reading

Online rant from Evavold shows she is a ticking time bomb

Dede Evavold’s poor decisions over the last few years have started to pile up, and an online rant from Evavold last evening shows she is a ticking time bomb.

In a post acknowledging that she is being sued in civil court by David Rucki, Samantha Rucki, and Gianna Rucki for her role in the disappearance of Samantha and Gianna for 944 days, Evavold made a direct threat at her “opponents”:

“It’s time that our opponents are subjected to the natural consequences of their cruel and criminal actions they have so freely wrought upon us. We need to go beyond acknowledgment of the corruption to actually taking action. Stop operating in fear and get on the frontlines!”

Evavold has a long history of using social media to threaten and harass David Rucki, his family, and anyone who reports on her criminal activity. Evavold and her blog have posted pictures of the Rucki home, maps to their home, and pictures of the Rucki family.

At her sentencing hearing last November, Judge Asphaug also said Evavold “showed no remorse or comprehension” for her actions against the Rucki family, adding that Evavold’s actions “disrupted a family for 944 days.”

In October, Evavold lost her appeal of her criminal conviction and just this week, Office of the Appellate Courts notified Evavold that her petition for review to the Minnesota Supreme Court was not properly filed and would need to be resubmitted.

Last evening, a clearly frustrated Evavold made it known who her “opponents” are and what she plans on doing. As with Sandra Grazzini-Rucki, Evavold’s behavior should scare you.

Below is a summary of what Missing in Minnesota has published in the last year about Evavold’s threatening behavior. Continue reading

Supreme Court hearing today on MacDonald’s law license

The Minnesota Supreme Court will hear oral arguments today at 9:00 A.M. regarding the Petition for Disciplinary Action against Michelle MacDonald, who is appealing a recommendation from a Minnesota Supreme Court referee that her law license be suspended.

A judicial referee appointed by the Minnesota Supreme Court recommended earlier this year that MacDonald’s law license be suspended for a minimum of 60 days, followed by two years of probation, which would include a mental health evaluation.

MacDonald’s behavior during a family court hearing for Sandra Grazzini-Rucki was described as “the ultimate dereliction of an attorney’s duty and is unquestionably serious misconduct warranting suspension” in a brief filed by the Minnesota Lawyers Professional Responsibility Board involving the attorney complaint against MacDonald.

A judicial referee appointed by the Minnesota Supreme Court recommended in January that MacDonald’s law license be suspended for a minimum of 60 days, followed by two years of probation, which would include a mental health evaluation.

The recommendation by Judge Heather Sweetland comes after a two-day hearing was held last November about an attorney complaint filed against MacDonald, who was a candidate for the Minnesota Supreme Court in 2014 and 2016.
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Dede Evavold facing additional jail time

Dede Evavold is facing more jail time after a judge in Dakota County accepted the recommendations of Dakota County Community Corrections who want Evavold back in jail for repeatedly violating the terms of her probation.

Evavold has been summoned to appear in Dakota County District Court for a Probation Violation Hearing on September 28, 2017.

According to a written recommendation submitted by Dakota County Community Corrections, Evavold violated the terms of probation when she “[f]ailed to comply with order to, not reference any of the Grazzini-Rucki family on any social media.”

As previously reported by Missing in Minnesota, Evavold has repeatedly violated the explicit terms of her probation by continuing to reference the Rucki family in her use of social media.

Evavold was sentenced on November 10, 2016 after being found guilty of six felony charges related to her involvement in the disappearance of Samantha and Gianna Rucki, who were abducted by their mother near their home in Lakeville, Minnesota on April 19, 2013 during a custody and divorce dispute involving their parents – Sandra Grazzini-Rucki and David Rucki. Continue reading

Evavold defends Neo-Nazi, Ku Klux Klan, and white supremacist gathering in Charolettesville

Dede Evavold, who was convicted of six felonies related to her involvement in the disappearance of two sisters, has published numerous posts defending the Neo-Nazi, Ku Klux Klan, and white supremacist gathering Charolettesville, Virginia which led to the death of three people.

Evavold’s defense of the Unite the Right rally held last week comes at a time when she is violating both a recently granted restraining order and the terms of her probation by harassing and threatening David Rucki and his family from Lakeville, Minnesota.

Missing in Minnesota is not linking to the posts published by Evavold because of the incendiary tone of material and also due to her perpetual harassment of the Rucki family.

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Dede Evavold violates restraining order

Dede Evavold has repeatedly violated the Harassment Restraining Order (HRO) granted by a court in Dakota County to protect the Rucki family from her continued harassment and threatening behavior.

Less than two weeks ago, a court in Dakota County ruled “an immediate and present danger of harassment” by Evavold existed to warrant the granting of an HRO requested by David Rucki and his daughter, Samantha Rucki, against Evavold.

Evavold was convicted last September of six felonies for her role in the disappearance of Samantha Rucki and her sister Gianna, who were abducted near their home on Lakeville by their mother Sandra Grazzini-Rucki, during a custody and divorce proceeding.

The HRO requested by David Rucki and Samantha Rucki also protected Gianna Rucki and two other minor Rucki children from being harassed by Evavold. According to court documents, the Harassment Restraining Order against Evavold is in effect until July 27, 2019.

Since the HRO was served on Evavold on July 31, 2017 at her home in St. Cloud, Evavold has ignored the court order by harassing and threatening the Rucki family in her use of social media.

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Convicted felon Evavold continues to harass Rucki family

Dede Evavold, who completed her jail sentence in January after being convicted of six felonies for her role in the disappearance of Samantha and Gianna Rucki from Lakeville, continues to harass and target the Rucki family in her use of social media.

As previously reported by Missing in Minnesota, Evavold has repeatedly violated the explicit terms of her probation by continuing to reference the Rucki family in her use of social media.

Evavold was charged in December 2015 related to her involvement in the disappearance of the Rucki sisters, who were taken by their mother near their home on the night of April 19, 2013, during a custody and divorce dispute involving their parents – Sandra Grazzini-Rucki and David Rucki.

Last week, Evavold’s blog published a post which not only mentions multiple members of the Rucki family, including Samantha Rucki, but the post also contained a picture surreptitiously taken of the Rucki family talking with their attorney before they entered a courtroom for a hearing.

After Evavold posted a picture of the Rucki home in Lakeville on social media, a representative of the Rucki family told Missing in Minnesota that Evavold’s behavior shows she does not comprehend the severity of her crimes, and that Evavold still poses a direct threat to the Rucki family and the general public.

On September 29, 2016, Evavold was found guilty on six felony counts for her role in the disappearance of the Rucki sisters. At that time, Judge Karen Asphaug made the decision to keep Evavold in custody rather than permitting her to return home until the time of her sentencing hearing on November 10, 2016.

In reference to her decision to remand Evavold to custody, Judge Karen Asphaug said, “…I do not have faith that she will appear for sentencing, nor do I have faith that she will obey the no-contact orders that have been issued in this case.” Continue reading